Line by Line: Act 1, Scene 1, Lines 44-48

BARNARDO: It would be spoke to. MARCELLUS:                                  Speak to it, Horatio. HORATIO: What art thou that usurp’st this time of night, Together with that fair and warlike form In which the majesty of buried Denmark Did sometimes march? By heaven, I charge thee speak. When last we left our supporting cast — Barnardo the Paranoid,…

H2016: Things Rank and Gross in Nature Possess it Merely

Auditions for Hamlet and Ophelia are tomorrow, but I’ve already written all I have to say about what/who I’m looking for, so I’m going to distract myself by talking about some more Big Picture stuff. This stems from an email discussion I had with a local artist and fellow Shakesgeek. I’ve already talked about the…

Line by Line: Act 1, Scene 1, Line 41

MARCELLUS:Thou art a scholar; speak to it, Horatio. At this point, your humble author reveals how rusty his research skills have become. Although I read Hamlet on my own in Grade 10, I didn’t study it until Grade 11. My teacher, Robin Carson, was enormously knowledgeable and articulate, to the point that I can still…

Line by Line: Act 1, Scene 1, Lines 25-28

MARCELLUS: Therefore I have entreated him along With us to watch the minutes of this night; That if again this apparition come, He may approve our eyes and speak to it. There are lots of textual details to explore here — the presence or absence of a comma after “With us,” for instance, which could…

Line by Line: Act 1, Scene 1, Lines 14-16

FRANCISCO: Give you good night. MARCELLUS:O, farewell, honest soldier; who hath relieved you? FRANCISCO: Bernardo has my place. Give you good night.  Exit. Nothing very spectacular here. Shakespeare is revving up his Revolving Door, the staging technique that kept his big, bare stage feeling busy and populated. Two characters just entered, so it’s time for…